Acknowledged Facts

Scholars Jewish, Christian or agnostic do in fact know quite a bit about Jesus. Virtually everybody agrees that we know at least the following:

when and where he lived;

that he started out within the orbit of John the Baptist;

that he was famous in his day as a teacher and healer;

that he proclaimed the Kingdom of God and warned of a looming catastrophe in Israel;

that he insisted on a radicalised ethic of love;

that he selected a group of twelve to symbolise a renewed Israel;

that he attracted many women into his circle and was notorious for dining with sinners;

that he caused a major, albeit symbolic, disturbance in the temple;

that he shared a final meal with his disciples during passover;

that he was handed over to Pontius Pilate by the priestly elite;

that he was crucified under the mocking charge of King of the Jews;

that numerous men and women insisted that they saw him alive shortly after his death;

and finally, that these followers established communities that looked forward to Christ’s kingdom and sought to win Jews and Gentiles to that vision.

Plenty of other details are considered probable or plausible, but these are the acknowledged facts about the historical Jesus.  Doubting them requires an arbitrary type of scepticism insensitive to historical method and consensus.

From: Jesus A Short Life by John Dickson.

And this photo is of a street preacher we met in London who was sharing the news of Jesus’ resurrection, he’s from Pakistan, lives in Glasgow, has the coolest Glaswegian/pakistani accent ever.  His courage is evident from his preaching on the streets of Whitechapel, in the heart of the Islamic community.

The best thing was seeing one of the street preachers repeatedly pleading to people to come forward and explain the evidence in support of evolution and not one person had the courage of their convictions, some offered abuse, most skulked away too ashamed of their ignorance about something into which they have so much faith.

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